Machine Translation: Friend or Foe For Human Translators?

Machine translation has a negative echo in many human translators’ ears. Many professional translators are afraid that as machine translation gets better and better, less and less human work is required and human translators might eventually lose their jobs.

Please consider this example. In the early 1900 car had just been invented. It was a new, exclusive technology. Car’s were difficult to manufacture and they were very expensive. What happened when Henry Ford developed ways to manufacture cars more efficiently and cheaply? One could think that some auto-workers lost their jobs because less people were required to manufacture a car. Instead, the opposite happened. The number of auto-workers increased dramatically because, thanks to more efficient and cheaper production, more and more people could now afford a car. Earlier middle or low income people had no chance of buying a car. When the car prices had sunk suddenly a lot of people could afford to buy a car and, in fact, actually bought one.

Now compare the professional translator’s situation to auto-worker’s situation. What will happen to professional translators when machine translation is making their work more effective? Will the professional translators lose their jobs? Or will the same happen with translators as with auto-workers in early 1900, when more and more companies and even private persons can really afford to buy translation and buying translation is becoming so easy in internet?

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Multilizer / Niko Papula

I am managing director of Multilizer, a Finnish software company specialising in software for enhancing translation quality, speed and cost.