Benefits of Language Standardization

Benefits-of-language-standardization-bLanguage standardization practically means that there are predefined guidelines and vocabulary for writing content. It isn’t a good method for novels or other emotional texts because it can make the story a bit monotonous, repetitive and robot-like. However, there are plenty of other text types that would benefit from some standardization ─ especially in the business world. Continue reading Benefits of Language Standardization

New Way of Thinking Translation Automation

new-way-of-thinking-translation-automationThere has been a lot of discussion about translation automation in recent years. One can have any kind of opinion about machine translation and other autoamtion technologies, but the fact is that technology has helped the translation industry to become more efficient. Technologies, like translation tools, text processing programs, grammar checkers, for example, ease the everyday translation work. Continue reading New Way of Thinking Translation Automation

What is important to the potential translation buyer?

how-to-choose-the-right-translation-servicePeople need translations for many reasons. Some people travel around the globe. Some people do international business. Most of us at least search for information in the internet and sometimes it is available only in a language that we don’t speak. Because the needs are so different, people use different criterion when choosing a translation service provider. Here’s a list of elements that are more or less important to most translation buyers. Continue reading What is important to the potential translation buyer?

Can context be fully understood?

chicroadAs Iina stated in a previous post, “context is machine translators’ weak point”. Likewise, Jonathan Downie wrote a guest post, which is a reply to this post of mine, where he states that context is a fundamental factor within the communication process. He sustains that context changes the perception of the message, and therefore it must be included as an element that “rearranges” the traditional sender-message-medium-receiver diagram. In general terms, I cannot disagree with the remark. Nevertheless, context can and should be thought of not only as a barrier to communication (when contexts are different), but also as something that allows communication (when it is shared). Continue reading Can context be fully understood?

Showing the Red Card to Simplified Translation Metaphors

This is a guest response by Jonathan Downie to a previous post.Showing Red Card to Simplified Translation Metaphors

Translators are often the subject of metaphors. We have been bridges, machines, conduits, tools and a lot more besides. Here on the Multilizer blog, one more metaphor was recently added to the pile. According to Pedro, translators are like referees: the more invisible we are, the better. Continue reading Showing the Red Card to Simplified Translation Metaphors

Non-native translation and localization. Opportunity for a best-practice?

Non-native-translators It is commonly asserted that the best translation can come only from a native speaker of the target language. This is mostly the case, but there is wide-enough range of exception that deserves to be specified. After all, wouldn’t we be ready to consider that a personal investment in learning languages generates a distinctive asset for an individual? Continue reading Non-native translation and localization. Opportunity for a best-practice?